Hello!:)

I hope this is okay,if not I will delete it!:P I have one question I have do a presintation about airplane engines for my final exams and does anyone know of any websites that would have data about that topic?I need hisory,how they work,..


Thank you,
~Lili:)
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Uber late Plane of the week

Vickers
Vimy
1918

Spec


Length: 43.6ft
Wing span: 67.1ft
weight: 7,100 lb
crew: 4
VNE: 103 mph
Ceiling: 7,000ft
Range: 1,000 miles
Engine: 2x 360hp Rolls Royce VIII

history

The twin engined Vimy, designed as a bomber, entered service just to late to play any major role in the first world war. It did however, achieve great success from the various long distance flights it embarked on, the most famous of which included the first trans-atlantic flight in 1919 by alcock annd Brown.

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image courtesy of vimy.org

Plane of the week

Messerschmitt
Me.163 Komet
1941

Specs

Length:18.7ft (5.7m)
wingspan: 30.6ft (9.32m)
Empty Weight: 4,200lb (1,900kg)
crew: 1
VNE: 596mph (960kmph)
Service ceiling: 39,500 ft
Range: 8 minutes
Engine: 1x 3750lb thrust Walten HWK 109 rocket motor

History

The Me.163 Komet was one of the most revolutionary fighters of WWII. It was designed as a superfast interceptor, with the intention of using the "zoom and boom" tactic, where one would use the phenominal rate of climg to quickly gain altitude, and would then attack the target in a fast dive. However, a mix of unpleasent flying characteristics, an unreliable motor and extremely volatile fuel, meant that more pilots were lost due to accidents than were shot down. It's limited range also greatly limited it's effectiveness.

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CAG bird

(no subject)

Grumman F6F Hellcat

specs

Length: 33 ft 7 in
Wingspan: 42 ft 10 in
Weight: 14,250 lb (maximum)
Crew: 1
Vmax = 376 mph
ceiling: 37,500ft
range: 1,090 mi
engine: Pratt and Whitney R-2800-10 Double Wasp with 2,000 HP
Later models had water injection and output rose to 2,200 HP
armament: 6 .50 caliber Browning machine guns, rockets, bombs

history

The Hellcat was responsible for destroying Japanese air power in the Pacific. This one aircraft type purportedly destroyed 6,000 Japanese aircraft. It was called the "ace maker" by Naval aviators. The top scoring Navy pilot, David McCampbell, flew this aircraft and had a total of 34 kills. Its main advantages over its nemesis, the Zero, were armament, armor, and speed in a dive. She was also known for being easy to handle around the boat and saving her pilots. In a crash, the structure tended to break around the pilot, often leaving them unscathed. This was the aircraft that earned Grumman the nickname "The Ironworks." She's one of the greatest fighters that has ever graced the U.S. arsenal. One Hellcat pilot quipped, "If she could cook, I'd marry her."

Hellcat


Thanks to http://www.angelfire.com/fm/compass/F6F.htm for most of this information, and www.daveswarbirds.com for the picture.

New flight sim time

Hello all.

I was Flying on the pc today, and decided that my ageing copy of flight simulator 2002 pro was getting a bit tired in it's old age. I have therefore decided to upgrade! Before I jump right in and buy fs2004, I was just wondering if there are any competiters to the microsoft flight sim throne? I remember hearing somewhere that x-plane is good, but never got the chance to test it.

So what flight sims do you use?

Also, I won't be able to do the plane of the week next week as I'll be stuck in Germany. If anybody want's to fill in for a week, that would be great, otherwise I'll leave it until monday.

Plane of the week

Cessna
152
1957

specs


Length: 21.6ft
Wingspan: 33.4ft
Weight: 985lb
Crew: 2
VNE: 108kt
cieling: 15,300ft
range: 563km
engine: 100hp continental flat four

history

The cessna 150 is possible one of the most successful light trainers in the history of aviation. First flying in 1957, it marked the end of a 6 year absence of cessna light trainers, and a dawn of a new era in flying. It's insanly stable flying characteristics, forgiving stall and tricycle undercarriage made it the perfect trainer. It's affordability means it was used in countles flight schools around the globe, and is still used widely today.

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information and picture courtesy of airliners.net.

Sorry, late yet again

Plane of the Week

Douglas
DC-3
1935

Specs


length: 64.5ft(19.6m)
wingspan: 95ft(29m)
empty weight: 16,290lb(7,390kg)
crew: 2
Passengers: 21
max cruise speed: 185mph(298kmph)
ceiling: 23,000ft
range: 1,500 miles
Engines: 2x900hp Wright Cyclones

history

The DC-3 Is the most famous airliner today, and possibly one of the most iconic aircraft of all time. Entering service in 1935, by 1938 it was already carrying a majority of american air travellers. It also had unparralled success as a troop carrier in WW2, and since then it has been used universally for a whole host of different roles, from firefighting to parachuting and all in between. Production ceased in 1945, after 13,000 were built, and they are still in service today.

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Plane of the week

Westland
Wyvern
1946

Specs


Engine: 1x Armstrong Siddeley Python turboprop 3,670 hp
Wing Span: 31.42m
Length: 12.8m
Height: 4.57m
Weight: Empty 7,076 kg / Loaded 11,113 kg
Maximum Speed: 708 kp/h
Ceiling: 8,535 m
Range: 1,464 km
Crew: 1

History

The Westland Wyvern, or originally the N.11/44 was originally designed to fulfill the specification of a Multi-roll Navy fighter. The aircraft Was originally designed for the Rolls-Royce 'eagle' engine, however this aircraft suffered from an unreliable engine and also encountered problems with the counter-rotating propeller. In 1953 the plane was redesigned to take the 'python' turboprob, and although this offered more power, the engine was very unresponsive and still unreliable, making it very hard to fly. Most pilots disliked the Wyvern, and it was taken out of service in 1958, with only 127 produced.

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ps. Sorry it's late again, I'm going to have to set up some sort of reminder

Plane of the week

De Havilland
Vampire
1943

specs


Length: 30.75ft (9.35m)
Wingspan: 40ft (12.2m)
empty weight: 6,370lb
crew: 1 pilot
VNE: 540mph
Ceiling: 40,000ft
range:730 miles
engine: one 3,100lb thrust D.H goblin

History

The D.H Vampire was the RAF's second jet aircraft to enter service. The unusual twin-boom layout was adopted to keep the tailpipe as short as possible which in turn minimised the loss of power from the engine. It was considered a pleasure to fly, and was an ideal introduction to jets for pilots. Those were just a few of the factors of which contributed the the great success of the aircraft worldwide. The Vampire was later developed into the venom, and in turn, the sea vixen, which reached near-supersonic speeds.

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Other sources: temora aviation museum

Plane of the week

Lockheed Aircraft Corporation
Electra
1934

specs


length: 38.6ft (11.8m)
wingspan: 55ft (16.76m)
Empty weight: 6,325lb (2,868kg)
Crew: 2 pilots, 10 passengers
Maximum cruising speed: 185mph (300kmph)
ceiling: 21,000ft
range: 810 miles (1,300km)
engines: two 450hp Pratt and whitney wasp juniors

History

The Lockheed electra was widely used by American airlines, due to a high reputation for speed and economy, and in 1936, was also adopted for routes in europe, particularly in the Scandanavian region. It revolutionised air travel between Britain and europe, and paved the way for the air services of today. It was also the aircraft in which Amelia Earhart tragically went missing in, over the pacific.

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Related Links: Amelia Earhart


p.s sorry It's late again!